Jul 012020
 

As the memories of the Velier Demeraras fades and the Caronis climb in price past the point of reason and into madness, it is good to remember the third major series of rums that Velier has initiated, which somehow does not get all the appreciation and braying ra-ra publicity so attendant on the others. This is the Habitation Velier collection, and to my mind it has real potential of eclipsing the Caronis, or even those near-legendary Guyanese rums which are so firmly anchored to Luca’s street cred.

I advertise the importance of the series in this fashion because too often they’re seen as secondary efforts released by a major house, and priced (relatively) low to match, at a level not calculated to excite “Collector’s Envy”. But they are all pot still rums, they’re from all over the world, they’re all cask strength, they’re both aged and unaged, and still, even years after their introduction, remain both available and affordable for what they are. When was the last time you heard that about a Velier rum? 

Since there is such a wide range in the series, it goes without saying that variations in quality and diverse opinions attend them all – some are simply considered better than others and I’ve heard equal volumes of green p*ss and golden praise showered on any one of them. But in this instance I must tell you right out, that the EMB released in 2019 is a really good sub-ten year old rum, just shy of spectacular and I don’t think I’m the only one to feel that way.

The first impression I got from nosing this kinetic 62% ABV rum, was one of light crispness, like biting into a green apple.  It was tart, nicely sweet, but also with a slight sourness to it, and just a garden of fruits – apricots, soursop, guavas, prunes – combined with nougat, almonds and the peculiar bitterness of unsweetened double chocolate.  And vanilla, coconut shavings and basil, if you can believe it.  All this in nine years’ tropical ageing?  Wow. It’s the sort of rum I could sniff at for an hour and still be finding new things to explore and classify.

The taste is better yet. Here the light clarity gives way to something much fiercer, growlier, deeper, a completely full bodied White Fang to the nose’s tamer Buck if you will.  As it cheerfully tries to dissolve your tongue you can clearly taste molasses, salted caramel, dates, figs, ripe apples and oranges, brown sugar and honey, and a plethora of fragrant spices that make you think you were in an oriental bazaar someplace – mint, basil, and cumin for the most part.  I have to admit, water does help shake loose a few other notes of vanilla, salted caramel, and the low-level funk of overripe mangoes and pineapple and bananas, but this is a rum with a relatively low level of esters (275.5 gr/hlpa) compared to a mastodon channeling DOK and so they were content to remain in the background and not upset the fruit cart. 

As for the finish, well, in rum terms it was longer than the current Guyanese election and seemed to feel that it was required that it run through the entire tasting experience a second time, as well as adding some light touches of acetone and rubber, citrus, brine, plus everything else we had already experienced the palate.  I sighed when it was over…and poured myself another shot.

Man, this was one tasty dram.  Overall, what struck me, what was both remarkable and memorable about it, was what it did not try to be. It didn’t display the pleasant blended anonymity of too many Barbados rums I’ve tried and was not as woodsy and dark as the Demeraras. It was strong yes, but the ageing sanded off most of the rough edges. It didn’t want or try to be an ester monster, while at the same time was individual and funky enough to please those who dislike the sharp extremes of a TECA or a DOK rum – and I also enjoyed how easily the various tastes worked well together, flowed into each other, like they all agreed to a non-aggression pact or something.  

It was, in short, excellent on its own terms, and while not exactly cheap at around a hundred quid, it is – with all the strength and youth and purity – a lot of Grade A meat on the hoof. It stomped right over my palate and my expectations, as well as exceeding a lot of other more expensive rums which are half as strong and twice as old but nowhere near this good…or this much fun. 

(#741)(86/100)

Nov 112019
 

After a week of soliciting the opinions of the readers of this site, I have, not without some reluctance, returned to the long-standing black-background theme that The Lone Caner has used from its earliest beginnings in 2010.

The poll I set up on Facebook suggested an even split between those who liked the white background to those who preferred the black, with comments were about 75-25 in favour of the black. Those who preferred the new look applauded its enhanced readability, while the others felt that there was no difference in that aspect, but something of the intrinsic originality and character of the site had been lost. “Just like Serge’s block is yellow background, the Lone Caner is the black,” remarked Joe.

In the end, I decided that the character – the look and feel – of the site was not enhanced, while not enough proponents of the readibility point of view came forward.  I sincerely apologize to Brian, Seth, Alan, Janwalcjak, Valentin, and all the others who felt that way but did not comment and will be disappointed.  But I will continue to experiment with some middle ground that will please the most people…for the moment, I guess Black is Beautiful, and it stays.

Thanks to everyone for weighing in – it’s nice to know that even for a small site like this one, people take the look seriously enough to comment on it when it changes.

Nov 052019
 

Comment below with whatever your thoughts are on the new scheme.  I’ll leave it up for a few days to gauge user reactions and then make a decision whether to keep it or not.

Oct 122014
 

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***

All “Wizard of Id” references in the photo aside, I must admit it’s good to return to reviewing. The steady, continuing hits on the site, the continual online and offline questions I get and then the explosion of interest after the reddit post went up, all lit a fire under my nether regions.  Plus, after a year in the Middle East, you would not believe how much I missed writing.

So I cut a deal with my wife that once a year I’d attend a European Rum Festival (Berlin, London or Madrid), and made a private deal with myself that I’d acquire as many rums as I could while there, taste a raft of everything available, put together tasting notes, photographs, scores and comparative rankings, and issue the reviews as best I could over the next months.  And hell, if I can get to buy samples in my current location (never mind how), yeah, I’ll do that too.

I’d like to say thanks to all the readers, most anonymous, some not, who actually read what I write and drop by every now and then.  I always thought my style was too different, too long, too at-odds with other established writers, to garner much support – it was quite a pleasant surprise to find that it was appreciated for precisely that reason by some (big hat-tip to you all, you know who you are).

So, the Caner’s back.  Now let’s see what’s next….

Aug 122013
 

Those who know me personally (both of you, ha ha) are aware that I’m upping anchor to another part of the world. After living and/or working on five continents, I’m relocating to the Middle East as of August 2013. This implies not only a total readjustment of my family life, but a consideration of the impact it will have on the updates I can make to this site.

In fine, I will have to cease writing rum reviews on a consistent basis for the foreseeable future, as sourcing alcohol of any kind will be next to impossible (and I don’t review unlabelled, home-brewed moonshine). This is not to say I will stop forever, but at least for a while this site will have to be somewhat moribund, with updates few and in between, usually when I’m out on holiday somewhere, I guess.

It pains me to have so much effort relegated to standing still for a long period (especially as I was approaching my 200th review slowly and steadily)…but them’s the breaks. I’m working on solving the El Dorado problem, you see.

I hope that one day, for those who will pass by to check in, another post will be up, another rum will be reviewed, and you’ll know that the Lone Caner is back in business. Until then, thanks to all of you for reading and looking at these reviews, and, now and in the future, I hope you had and have as much fun with them as I did when I wrote them.

Goodbye for a while…but not farewell.

Ruminsky, “The Lone Caner”

 

Mar 042013
 

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The Lone Caner originated in a book and spirits club called Liquorature, of which the Caner is a founding member.

This site is geared towards rum reviews that people (hopefully) stop over to check out, before dropping big bucks on sterling products.  Or minor bucks on so-so products.  Or maybe just to read something interesting. That is, after all, how it all started, and it’s been a long, fascinating journey with no end in sight. For more information, see the “About” tab at the top of this page.

Have fun, and enjoy.

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